Vai al contenuto

dagon

Members
  • Portfolio

    Portfolio
  • Numero messaggi

    6711
  • Registrato

  • Ultima Visita

  • Days Won

    2

Attività reputazione

  1. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da Climoummiciah in Interior Lighting In Mental Ray   
    - Link alla versione italiana:
    http://www.treddi.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=4858


    English Translation by Gtsix http://www.pixeloverdrive.com

    This tutorial comes from the experience gained by me and other treddi.com members during the last months of tests made for reaching good quality interior renderings with Mental Ray.
    So I want to begin thanking all those who have contributed to the tests and shared his/her own experiences and settings.
    Particularly, I wish to thank Stefano (gtsix) for the English translation and Alessando (Pantich78), that has been the first one to read the draft of this tutorial and provided interesting cues that allowed me to deepen some aspects of the topic.

    The tutorial can easily be followed by whoever uses mental ray (on maya/3d max/xsi/hudini and others)

    What I will illustrate is just one of the many possible methods for achieving this kind of illumination, and should be considered as a starting point to begin your own experimentations with mental ray, from many people around the world considered one of the most difficult rendering engine to use for this type of task.

    Some of the steps you’ll find on this tutorial will seem to be repetitive or unmeaningful, but I decided to keep all of them in order to give the reader all the info he/she needs in the clearest way possible. After reading and understanding this tutorial, he/she’ll be able to optimize his/her own personal method, skipping some steps or mixing others. It’s just a matter of experience! ;-)

    This is a wide subject, so I have chosen to describe the method in a very general way and to try to touch a bit of all of the correlated topics.
    If anyone should need some help, just write me (obviously it could be possible that I won’t have a ready-to-use answer, but I will try to help you anyway ).
    In this tutorial I will assume that the reader has a basic knowledge of Maya and Mental Ray.

    These are the tutorials sections:



    1. Basic lighting system
    1.1 Light choosing and positioning
    1.2 Lights settings
    1.2.1 Sunlight
    1.2.2 “Diffuse” light
    1.3 How to “balance” the lights in the scene
    1.4 Final Gather
    1.4.1 How to set up the Final Gather
    1.5 How to set up the final rendering
    2. Other types of lighting systems


    1. Basic lighting system
    Before writing this tutorial I have done many tests using various types of lights and settings. You’ll find them here
    The lights that I’m going to use in this tutorial are those that I think are more effective in this kind of rendering, in terms of quality/speed and in terms of matching an ideal photorealistic lighting system.
    I’ll use of two types of lights, the first one simulates the direct light and the other one will simulate the “diffuse” light.


    1.1 Light choosing and positioning
    First of all you have to download the tutorial scene. It’s available in these formats:
    .obj
    .mb
    .3ds


    Open the file. It’s japan-style room (already famous over the www.treddi.com forum ). Set the scene units to centimeters. Remember that after importing a 3ds or .obj model into Maya you will have the settings “Visible in reflection” e “Visible in refraction” disabled, so you will have to turn them on manually under the “Render Stats”

    Now we can put the lights in our scene.

    a. Sunlight
    With the first light you will simule the sunlight. Considering the several possibilites I decided to use a spotlight, later on we will see the alternatives.
    Position one spot far enough from the room, so you can use a little opening angle (20° approximately) remember that the spot does not have parallel beams, so using a little angle will allow you to simulate better the ideal sunlight.

    b. “Diffuse” light
    Create a point light and open the light’s attributes. Under the mental ray section turn on the “Area Light” option. Move the light until it’s lined up with the window and scale its radius so that the edges approaches the opening-width of the window (you can eventually reduce it a bit to prevents problems with overexposed areas on the walls near the window)

    In the following images you can see how I positioned the lights.





    1.2 Lights settings
    In order to understand the behavior of the lights, I suggest you to begin the tests with only one light turned on.

    Assign a white shader (I suggest a Lambert or DGS without glossy and specular) to your model.


    1.2.1 Sunlight
    Select the point light and disable it (deselect the following options: “Illuminates by Default”, “Emit Diffuse”, “Emit Specular")

    Select the spot light and edit its attributes: turn on the raytraced shadows with the default options (you can give a slight angle variation to the beams if you want)

    Open the “Renderglobal” > “Quality Presets” menu and select “Preview”
    to get a quick render of your first test.
    If you followed the instructions correctly you should get something like this:

    Change the light intensity until the illumination level of the visible areas seems good to you.

    -Now activate the GI in the “Renderglobal” menu and set the “Global Illum Accuracy” to 512, keeping the “Global Illum Radius” to 0 (default).
    -Change the settings of the i]“Raytracing” (4-4-8 should go well)
    -Also turn on “Emit Photons” in the attributes of the spotlight and perform a test render to examine the illumination levels of the parts of the room which are not directly lit by the spotlight.

    Remember that the amount of the light that will effect your model is also directly related to the distance from the object.
    The further from the model your light is, the higher you will have to set the intensity of the photons. For example I reached 185.000.000 to get this result:


    Now increase the number of the photons to 500.000 and your render will look something like this:


    I suggest you to activate the “Progressive Messages” (“Renderglobal” > “Translation” > ”Progressive messages”) , so you can monitor the rendering times of the different tests.


    1.2.2 “Diffuse” light
    Now we will perform the same steps for our point light (that we have previously transformed in a Mental Ray Area Light, see chapter
    - Disable the Spotlight (remember you have to check-off “Emit Photons”)
    - Activate the raytrace shadows of the point light; I suggest you to use a “Decay linear”
    - As for your Photon settings, use the same photon settings you used in your spotlight except for the intensity, which should be very small (in this case I’m using 100.000) .
    - Perform the same render as done for the spotlight.

    Only direct light:


    (Don’t worry about the graininess of the shadows, we will tweak it later adjusting the settings for the final render)


    direct light + photons



    1.3 How to “balance” the lights in the scene

    Activate both the lights and perform another render.
    If you are lucky you’ll get the correct lighting and illumination, but more likely you’ll have to tweak your light settings to get the result you have in mind.
    Obviously the changes your’re going to do will vary depending on the lighting effect you want to reach for your render!

    Here's my test:


    Don’t worry if some of the areas are overexposed, when we’ll activate the final gather the problem will be almost fixed.
    Anyway, if you want you can do a small test: do a region render of the most significant areas of your scene, simply activating the final gather with the following settings: “rays”: 100 “min max radius”: 0/0 and “rebuild photon map” turned off. This is my result:


    If you still have problems with over-exposed ares or getting weird artifacts I suggest you to slightly decrease the photons intensity of the spotlight and also slightly decrease the intensity of the point light (mostly if the over-exposed areas are those directly affected by the area light).

    Now that the light seems more balanced we’ll start optimizing the GI.
    This is the Maya “Caustic and Global illumination” panel.


    Here you are some short descriptions of the main GI settings:
    - “Global Illum Accuracy”: this value, that we have already set to 512, represents the quality of the photon map.

    - “Global Illum Radius”: we’ll set it later. As for now just remember that the default value is 0: with this value mental ray calculates the best setting for the render (in 90% of cases you can keep this setting). Anyway, to optimize our rendering times we’ll hand-calculate it.

    - “Max Photon Depth”, “Max Reflection Photons” e “Max Refraction Photons”, are the settings of the well-known photon bounces. They set the number of bounces that our photons will perform before they stop.
    The first value indicates the maximum amount of bounces.

    Now we have to choose the Photon Volume Radius and the Max Photon Depth. Talking about Depth, I’m getting good results using the default settings (5-5-5).
    Remember that higher depth values means more light in the dark areas of your render, but it will also increase your render times.
    As I said before, changing the Photon Volume Radius will allow us to optimize our render speed.
    You can test it performing a render (GI only) with the Photon Volume Radius set to 0 (best quality).
    Have a look at the render times: 50 seconds (on my workstation off course)


    Do your experiments increasing the radius value and see how your render-time changes (obviously along with the image quality)

    You can start with very low radiuses (1 for example) and increase the value until you get a result similar to the first render (with radius 0), but with lower render-times. Remember that the radius is expressed in local scene units.
    When performing these tests turn off “rebuild photon map”, in order to speed up the test renders.
    Remember that in this phase even the smaller time gap between your tests could lead to considerably different rendering speeds when working on the final render. So, every second counts!

    Here you will see my radius-changing tests:




    I chose radius = 15


    1.4 Final Gather

    We finally arrived to the quite controversial Final Gather.
    For these tests, if you don’t have to change the lights settings or scene materials, you can leave the “Rebuild Photon Map” checkbox disabled.

    Here’s the Maya panel:

    To get an idea of the final gather options I suggest you to check out this link:
    http://www.lamrug.org/presentations/jun2003/img0.html

    I will try to make you a short resume of how it works.
    Anyway, take this resume just like a “Final Gather for Dummies”, because it’s a very complex subject and (as for now) I don’t have the necessary knowledge to do a full in-deep explanation of every aspect of it.

    If you’re not too much interested in the theoretical description of the Final Gather, you can jump to the 1.4.1 section.
    Substantially the Final Gather allows you to calculate and save the irradiance informations in a local map. The final gather calculation is made of two phases:

    1- precomputation
    during this first phase the image is subdivided in an hexagonal/triangular grid; for each point of the grid a ray is sent from the camera to the scene; when a ray “collides” with a scene object, an hemispheric set of FG rays is emitted from that intersection point; those FG rays will allow the calculation and storage of the local irradiance informations.

    2- extra computatio & interpolation
    the second phase happens during the rendering (or, partially, before, if you activate the “Precompute Photon Lookup” tag). The previously saved map is re-used and the results are interpolated using the min/max radius.
    This means that for each point previously calculated, the local irradiance results are interpolated between the min/max radius range.
    If the max radius should be too small to cover every part of the scene, the FG will automatically emit other rays in order to succesfully complete the scene computation.

    To see how the final gather effects our scene, just activate the Diagnostic option under “Renderglobal” > “Diagnostics” > “Diagnose Finalgather”
    The green points are those calculated in the first phase (precalculation) while the red ones are those generated during the rendering process.


    Well, after this short resume, I can start explaining the parameters you’ll find in the RenderGlobal Menu.
    “Min/Max Radius” As said before, these are the values used by the Final Gather to interpolate the local irradiance results. Lower values will provide higher details and higher render-times.
    “Min/Max Radius” can be expressed in real world units (cm in this case) or in pixel; Mental Ray 3.4 users can activate this setting simply checking the “View (Radii in pixel size)” option. For previous Mental Ray versions you can check the LAmrUG web site at this link: LAmrUG.

    Working in pixel units gives us a big advantage: is a lot easier to find the needed interpolation values watching our raster render instead of thinking about the real-world units of our scene.

    The “Final Gather Rays” are those rays hemispherically emitted from each calculated Final Gather point:
    increasing the number of emitted rays means a better accuracy of the local irradiance calculations. For the overall calculation accuracy also mind the min/max radius values!
    The Radius value has nothing to do with the rays length, since this one is setted by the “Falloff start/stop” parameter.
    Another important parameter we must handle is “filter”, wich eliminates eventual weird local irradiance spots (usually overbright dots) evaluating near irradiance values. Using this filter will affect both the Final Gather quality and the rendering speed.
    Other important parameters are “Trace Depth”, “Trace Reflection” e “Trace Refraction”. Conceptually they work like the bounce depth controls for the primary GI calculations.
    The last “Secondary Diffuse Bounces” checkbox activates the famous “multibounce” (you’ll find it only on Mental Ray 3.4), but we won’t use it since this parameter is inactive when Global Illumination is turned on.

    “Preompute Photon Lookup” pre-estimates some of the FG calculations to be perfomed during the rendering process. This option is very important when working on animations, since it reduces rendering times.


    1.4.1 How to set up the Final Gather

    Here are the parameters I used for the test

    your settings should be similar:
    “Rays”: 50 (for mental ray 3.3 you will need at least 100-200)
    Change the filter“Filter” from 0 to 1
    Leave the “Radius” at 0 and launch a est render at a low resolution (400x300)



    Now let’s see how to optimize the radius. If you’re already satisfied with the result obtained using the default radius but still want to optimize your rendering-time, you could have a look at the MR output window and check for the radius automatically set from MR and try to adjust this value. Only remember that lower radius means more details and more noise.

    For my own tests I usually start with small radius values and with few rays, in order to keep my rendering-times low. I also perform various “Render region” of the most “critical” areas of the scene. This allows me to get the best compromise between scene detail and render-speed.

    Here you’ll find some test made using different radiuses:




    You can increase the radius so that to eliminate (or at least greatly reduce) that “noisy” effect you get using small radius values.
    Remind that this value is scale-dependent. You should get an optimal time/quality compromise using radiuses from 1 to 10.
    Once you found the radius that fits your needs, do some Render region of those areas where you see rendering artifacts, and increase the number of emitted rays to eliminate them.
    This value is strictly dependent from the Mental Ray version you’re using. The 3.4 version is highly optimized for low radius values, while previous versions need higher values (and this meand higher rendering times).



    1.5 How to set up the final rendering

    For the final rendering there are some important things that need do be handled properly and here you’ll find a short description of each one.


    1.5.1 The materials
    To get a photorealistic render the materials assigned to the objects are fundamental. I suggest you to learn everything you can about the Mental Ray materials, particularly the dgs, the dielectric and some other interesting shaders (dgs_fresnel, l_glass). The tutorial made by Alessandro (Pantich) about those shaders is surely an excellent beginning.

    The advantages you’ll get by using these materials are mainly of two types: shorter rendering times and better light behaviour.
    If you started this tutorial using a lambert shader, simply assign a DGS material (without glossy reflections) to every object in your scene and do a rendering test to see the difference between the two shaders.
    Remember that, as for other Mental Ray shaders, if you wish to use a DGS material you must set the dgs_photon or the mib_photon_basic into the “photon shader”.

    When setting up a scene, I suggest you to choose a shader type and then use it for the whole project.
    If you start with a Lambert shader (a maya native shader), keep using maya shaders for every object in your scene, otherwise your render could show very weird (and unwanted) artifacts.


    1.5.2 Anti-Aliasing quality

    For the final rendering is very important to optimize the AA. My advice is to use the Mitchell filter: in Mental Ray it offers the best quality/speed.

    The most important AA settings are “Numbers of Samples” e “Contrast Threshold”

    The “Min Sample Level” indicates the smallest number of rays that mental ray uses. The “Max Sample Level” (obviously ), the max number of rays.

    note
    The sampling values in mental ray for Maya do NOT increase linearly but exponentially. Therefore if you use 0 samples you will get 1 ray, 1 sample: 4 rays, 2 samples: 16 rays and so on. This means that too high values will greatly affect rendering time.
    In 3dsmax the parameters are different: they control the number of rays, therefore if in Maya the sampling parameter is set to 2, in 3dsmax should be set to 16, etc

    How can we determine the min and max samples? By setting the “Contrast Threshold”. ” values.
    This often neglected parameter is fundamental for getting good results.
    If in a particular area of the render the chosen contrast threshold is surpassed, mental ray will use the max samples, while if the contrast remains below that threshold, it will use the min samples. This comes useful if your render has wide uniformly colored areas, where high sample values are almost meaningless.
    At this link you’ll find an in-deep analysys of the Contrast Threshold parameter made by the LAmrUG

    These are the settings that I suggest you :

    Mitchell 4 | 4

    Min samples 0 (either -1) (for 3d max 1 or 1/4)
    Max samples 2 (for 3d max 16)

    R 0,05 G 0,05 B 0,05


    1.5.3 Area Light Sampling

    This parameters sets the amount of noise in the shadows generated by the Mental Ray Area Lights.
    In our case we should choose the Point Light and go to the “Mental ray” > “Area Light” panel.
    To get the best results from your rendering you must know how to handle the following parameters:

    “Sampling”: number of shadow samples
    “Low Level”: the number of bounces (reflection/refraction depth) beyond which Mental Ray begins to stop using the “Sampling” parameter and starts using the “Low Samples”. Setting this value to 0 (default), means that Mental Ray won’t use the low samples.
    “Low Samples”: sampling value that can be set for the secondary bounces of your shadows.

    For good results I suggest you to use the following parameters:

    Samples 6-6 (max 8-8)
    Low Level 0 (either 2)
    Low Samples 3-3 (or 4-4)

    Example: using Area Light Samples default (3-3)

    Samples 6-6





    1.5.4 Light color

    To achieve a photorealistic interior-lighting, it is nessesary to change the color of the light to a real life light color. In Mental Ray 3.4 we have a new utility, that I think is really powerful, that allow us to choose the color of the light based on a Kelvin Temperature scale. This is the diagram for you to follow:


    The trick is to pick a color similar to the sunlight for the spotlight and a color similar to the skylight for the Area Light

    Mib_cie_d


    In the case you are using a version of Mental Ray previous to 3.4 you can use a yellow/orange color for both the lights and a ligh-blue color for the photons.



    1.5.5 Bsp The Binary Spatial Partitioning
    “Render Global> Memory and Performance” is a really important parameter for the rendering speed optimization. Also for this topic, an in-deep exploration of this parameter would require a specific tutorial. Anyway you can find interesting informations (as always) about the BSP on the LAmrUG site at this address.
    My advice is to do a lot of lo-res renderings (or Render region tests of the most “critical” or complex parts of your scene) changing the BSP value by steps of 3. For example if you start with 40 try 37/34/31 and so on. Compare the rendering times and find the value that best fits your needs.


    1.5.6 Output framebuffer
    Mental ray hasn’t got a real tonemapping control, but there are different workarounds that allow us to solve this problem.

    One way is to use the “gamma” parameter ( “Render Global” > “”Framebuffer” > “gamma") that controls the overall brightness of the rendered image, in particular for its shadowed areas (values lower than 1 increase the brightness)
    However my advice is to adopt another workaround: export the render in a 32bit format and adjust the tonemapping in post-production. Mental ray, from the 3.3 version, supports the OpenExr (32bit) format. You can find news and plugins for this image format at the following address: OpenExr
    This format offers greater advantages than the HDR format (as has a greater dynamic range) and the TIF format (as it allows to store the data in half-space respect to the classic RGBA 16bit format)

    If you are a Mental Ray 3.4 user is very easy to use the EXR format: in the “Framebuffer” set RGBA (float) 4x32bit and choose the OpenExr “image format”.

    If you use the 3.3 Version of MR, exporting your rendering in EXR format is a bit more complicated. I suggest you to download the mrclasses made by Gonzalo Garramunos from this site and use the output_exr shader as output shader for your camera. Thanks to it you’ll be able to export your render in EXR format.

    Here you’ll find the values I used for the final rendering, the one you see at the beginning of the tutorial.


    - RENDER GLOBAL
    AA Quality
    Samples -1 | 2
    Mitchel: 4 | 4
    Contrast R: 0,05
    Contrast G: 0,05
    Contrast B: 0,05
    Contrast A: 0,1

    Raytracing
    Reflection: 4
    Refraction: 4
    Max Trace Depth: 8

    GI
    Accuracy: 512
    Radius: 15
    Max Photon Depth: 5
    Max Reflection Photon: 5
    Max Refraction Photon: 5

    Final Gather
    Rays: 400
    Min / Max Radius: 2 | 15
    Filter: 1
    Trace Depth: 2
    Trace Reflection: 1
    Trace Refraction: 1

    - Other Settings:
    Area Light
    Sampling: 6 | 6
    Low Level: 0


    2.0 Other types of lighting systems

    As I have already told you before, I made various tests to choose the “best” lighting scheme for this kind of render. Below you’ll find a list of the tests I’ve done, with the light I used and the resulting render.
    If you are seeking a particular kind of illumination, you can choose from these various possible combinations.

    (Sunlight + “Diffuse” light)

    Direct + point(arealight) with physical_light


    Direct + point(arealight)


    Direct + spot(arealight)


    Spot + physical


    Spot + spot(arealight)


    I hope this tutorial will help at least some of you MR freaks around the world!
    If you find some mistakes or information inaccuracies in this tutorial (you know, it became so long!!), please let me know!

    ciau

    Mat
    http://www.imodesti.com


    - References:
    http://www.lamrug.org
    http://www.jupiter-jazz.com/
    http://www.impresszio.hu/szabolcs/MentalRa...RaySampling.htm

  2. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da Paki Smith in Illuminazione D'interni Con Mental Ray   
    English version



    Questo tutorial nasce dall'esperienza accumulata da me e altri utenti di treddi.com durante gli ultimi mesi, ricchi di test fatti per raggiungere una buona qualità nel rendering di interni. Voglio quindi iniziare ringraziando tutti quelli che hanno contribuito ai test e condiviso le proprie esperienze e impostazioni. In particolare ringrazio Stefano (gtsix) per la traduzione in inglese e Alessando (Pantich), che è stato il primo a leggere la bozza di questo tutorial e mi ha dato spunti interessanti per approfondire alcuni argomenti.

    Il tutorial può essere seguito tranquillamente da chiunque utilizzi mental ray (su maya/3d max/xsi/budini e quant'altri)

    Quello che andrò ad illustrare è uno dei tanti possibili metodi per questo tipo di illuminazione e vuole essere un punto di partenza, una base su cui poter iniziare le proprie sperimentazioni su mental ray, che come molti sapranno è da sempre considerato ostico da usare in questo tipo di rendering.

    Alcuni dei passaggi che andrò a elencare sembreranno ripetitivi o poco significativi, ho deciso di elencarli tutti in maniera più chiara possibile proprio per dare la possibilità a voi di trovare e ottimizzare il vostro metodo personale, imparerete pian piano a raggruppare o eliminare alcuni dei passaggi elencati, si tratta solo di guadagnare esperienza.

    L'argomento è molto ampio e comprende tanti piccoli aspetti che in alcuni casi possono fare la differenza per la resa di un rendering finale. Per questo ho deciso di descrivere il metodo in maniera molto generale e cercare di toccare un po' tutti gli argomenti correlati, per chi avesse bisogno di approfondimenti può scrivermi (ovviamente non è detto che io abbia la risposta, ma ci provo insomma )
    Nel tutorial darò per scontata una conoscenza di base sia di maya che di mental ray

    Queste sono le sezioni in cui ho deciso di suddividere il tutorial:


    1. Illuminazione di base
    1.1 Scelta e posizionamento delle luci
    1.2 Setting delle luci
    1.2.1 Luce solare
    1.2.2 Luce "diffusa"
    1.3 Come bilanciare le luci
    1.4 Final Gather
    1.4.1 Impostare il Final Gather
    1.5 Impostare il rendering finale
    2. Altri tipi di illuminazione


    1. Illuminazione di base
    Per la preparazione di questo tutorial ho svolto svariate prove con diversi tipi di luci e impostazioni che potrete trovare qui
    Quelle che vi proporrò in seguito saranno le luci che ritengo più performanti a livello di rendering, quindi sia in termini di rapporto qualità/velocità, sia in termini di corrispondenza a un'illuminazione fotorealistica.
    Le mie prove partono dall'uso di due tipi di luci, una deputata a simulare la luce solare (o diretta) e l'altra che permette di simulare un effetto di luce "diffusa"


    1.1 Posizionamento delle luci
    Innanzitutto scarichiamo la scena che potete trovare nei seguenti formati:
    .obj
    .mb
    .3dsmb

    Aperta la scena vi troverete di fronte a una stanza in stile giapponese (già famosa su questo forum)
    Impostate le unità di misura della scena in centimetri.
    Ricordate che importando da .3ds o .obj il modello in Maya avrete le impostazioni "Visible in reflection" e "Visible in refraction" disabilitate, per cui dovrete andarle ad abilitare manualmente sui "Render Stats"

    Andiamo a posizionare due luci

    a. Luce solare
    la prima luce avrà il compito di simulare la luce diretta.
    tra le varie possibilità prese in considerazione, ho deciso di utilizzare una spot, più avanti vedremo le alternative posizioniamo uno spot abbastanza distante dalla stanza, in modo da riuscire a mantenere un angolo di apertura abbastanza basso (20° circa) vi ricordo che la spot non ha raggi paralleli, per cui tenere un cono di apertura basso serve proprio a cercare di dare ai raggi incidenti un effetto più vicino possibile alla realtà

    b. luce "diffusa"
    create una luce point (omni per 3d studio) e attivate negli attributi della luce relativi a mental ray l'opzione "Area Light", spostate la luce fino a farla combaciare con la finestra e ingranditela in modo che i bordi si avvicinino all'apertura reale della stessa (tenerla un po' più piccola serve ad avere meno problemi di sovraesposizione sui muri vicini)

    in figura potete vedere i miei posizionamenti:




    1.2 Setting delle luci
    Per capire il comportamento delle luci consiglio di iniziare le prove con una luce alla volta.

    Assegnate a tutto il modello uno shader bianco (consiglio un lambert o un dgs senza glossy e specular)


    1.2.1 Luce solare
    Ciccate sulla point e disabilitatela (eliminate le spunte su "Illuminates by Default", "Emit Diffuse", "Emit Specular")

    Ciccate sulla spot e nelle proprietà attivate le ombre raytrace, impostazioni di default (potete dare un leggero angle ai raggi se preferite)

    Andate nel "Renderglobal" > "Quality Presets" e impostate "Preview"
    eseguendo il primo render di prova con valori di default, otterrete qualcosa di simile:


    Aumentate l'intensità della luce fino a raggiungere un buona illuminazione nelle zone esposte.

    Ora attivate la GI nel "Renderglobal" e impostate la la "Global Illum Accuracy" a 512, tenendo il "Global Illum Radius" a 0 (default)
    Cambiate le impostazioni del "Raytracing" (4-4-8 dovrebbero andare bene)
    Attivate anche l'impostazione "Emit Photons" nelle proprietà della luce e eseguite le prove per riuscire a illuminare le parti della stanza non esposte a luce diretta.
    Ricordatevi che le proprietà della luce spot dipendono dalla distanza in cui si trova dall'oggetto, per cui, avendo posto la spot lontano dalla stanza avrete da aumentare di parecchio l'intensità dei fotoni (io ad esempio sono arrivato a 185.000.000) per arrivare a un risultato del genere:


    Ora aumentate il numero dei fotoni a 500.000 e renderizzate.
    Avrete un rendering del genere:


    Vi consiglio di attivare la voce "Progressive Messages" ("Renderglobal" > "Translation" > "Progressive messages") , in modo da poter controllare i tempi di rendering delle varie prove.


    1.2.2 Luce "diffusa"
    Ora andiamo ad eseguire gli stessi passaggi per la point (che abbiamo precedentemente trasformato in mental ray area light)
    - Disabilitiamo la spot (ricordate anche la spunta su "Emit Photons" )
    - Attiviamo le ombre raytrace sulla point; consiglio di utilizzare per la luce un "Decay linear", - Stesse impostazioni della spot per i fotoni, tranne per l'intensity che sarà molto inferiore (io in questo caso sto utilizzando 100.000)
    - Eseguite le stesse prove fatte per la spot

    Solo luce diretta (non preoccupatevi della granulosità delle ombre, andremo a sistemarla in seguito, nelle impostazioni del render finale)


    luce diretta + fotoni



    1.3 Come bilanciare le luci

    Attiviamo entrambe le luci e andiamo a fare un render
    se siete stati abbastanza accorti avrete un illuminazione abbastanza equilibrata, avrete probabilmente da diminuire una delle due luci (a seconda degli effetti che vorrete ottenere)

    ecco la mia prova:


    non spaventatevi troppo per le zone sovraesposte, quando andremo ad attivare il final gather si vedranno molto meno (in ogni caso, se volete fare una piccola prova, fate un render region delle zone più significative, attivando semplicemente il final gather con le seguenti impostazioni:
    rays 100 min max radium: 0/0 e disabilitando la spunta "rebuild photon map")
    questo è il mio risultato:

    Se avete problemi di zone eccessivamente illuminate o artefatti il mio consiglio è diminuire leggermente l'intensità dei fotoni della spot e diminuire leggermente l'intensità della point (preferibile in presenza di bruciature nella parti più esposte all'area light)

    Ora che la luce sembra equilibrata iniziamo a ottimizzare la GI
    Questo è il pannello su maya:


    brevemente le impostazioni principali sono:
    - "Global Illum Accuracy",che abbiamo già impostato a 512 e, come dice anche il nome, rappresenta la qualità della photon map

    - "Global Illum Radius", andremo ad impostarlo tra poco, il valore di default è 0, con questa impostazione mental ray calcola da solo l'impostazione migliore per il render (e questo nel 90% dei casi può già andare bene), per ottimizzare i tempi di rendering noi andremo a calcolare a mano il radius migliore

    - "Max Photon Depth", "Max Reflection Photons" e "Max Refraction Photons", sono le impostazioni dei famosi bounces, il numero dei rimbalzi che faranno I fotoni prima di fermarsi. Il primo valore indica il totale, per cui reflection+refraction avranno al massimo 5 rimbalzi.

    Ora si tratta di decidere il radius e il depth per la GI.
    Per il depth io ho ottenuto dei buoni risultati tenendo quello di default (5-5-5). Ricordate che maggiore è il depth utilizzato e maggiore sarà la luce nelle zone meno esposte, di contro avrete anche tempi di rendering maggiori.
    Per il radius, come detto, si tratta sostanzialmente di un'ottimizzazione per i tempi di rendering
    Eseguite un rendering come in precedenza (solo GI) con radius 0
    controllate i tempi:


    iniziate ad usare dei radius bassi (partite da 1) e aumentate fino ad avere un risultato paragonabile al primo render con radius 0, ma con tempi più bassi (vi ricordo che il radius è espresso in unità locali della scena)
    eseguite le prove disabilitando la spunta "rebuild photon map", in modo da velocizzare al massimo i test (ricordate che valori minimi in questa fase possono risultare molto importanti nel rendering finale)
    qui trovate gli effetti del radius sulla scena:




    io ho scelto radius = 15


    1.4 Final Gather

    siamo arrivati al tanto discusso Final Gather
    per queste prove, se non modificherete le opzioni delle luci o dei materiali nella scena, potrete tenere disabilitata la spunta "Rebuild Photon Map"

    ecco il pannello di maya:

    Per avere un'idea di come funzioni il final gather vi consiglio questo link:
    http://www.lamrug.org/presentations/jun2003/img0.html

    Provo a farvi un riassunto, ma prendete questa spiegazione con le molle perché è un argomento molto complesso e non ho le conoscenze necessarie per approfondire più di tanto l'argomento
    Per chi non fosse interessato a una descrizione teorica, può procedere con la parte pratica del tutorial, saltando alla sezione 1.4.1

    In sostanza il final gather permette di calcolare e salvare in una mappa informazioni locali di irradianza. Il calcolo del final gather è suddiviso in due parti:

    1- precomputation
    durante questa prima fase l'immagine viene suddivisa tramite una griglia esagonale/triangolare, per ciascun punto della griglia viene tracciato un raggio dalla camera alla scena, nel momento in cui il raggio incontra una geometria della scena vengono fatti partire dei raggio in uno spazio emisferico, che permettono di calcolare le informazioni locali di irradianza.

    2- extra computatio & interpolation
    la seconda fase avviene durante il rendering (oppure, in parte, in precedenza, se viene spuntata l'opzione "Precompute Photon Lookup"). La mappa salvata precedentemente viene riutilizzata e avviene l'interpolazione dei risultati tramite la dimensione del min/max radius, ovvero per ciascun punto calcolato in precedenza i risultati di irradianza locale vengono interpolati all'interno del range tra il raggio minimo e massimo. Nel caso questa zona di influenza (definita dal max radius), venisse oltrepassata, il final gather provvedere a far partire altri raggi.

    Per osservare gli effetti del final gather sulla scena potete attivare la modalità diagnostica andando su "Renderglobal" > "Diagnostics" > "Diagnose Finalgather"
    il rendering vi restituirà in verde i punto calcolati durante la prima fase del final gather (precomputation) e in rosso quelli aggiunti nella fase di rendering


    Dopo questa breve infarinatura passo a spiegarvi i parametri che vedete nel renderglobal.
    "Min/Max Radius" come detto rappresentano i valori tramite cui il final gather interpola i risultati di irradianza locale, quindi sostanzialmente, valori molto bassi restituiranno maggiori dettagli, ma anche maggiori tempi di calcolo.
    "Min/Max Radius" possono essere espressi in unità del modello (cm nel nostro caso) oppure in pixel (per chi usa mental ray 3.4 può attivare questa impostazione semplicemente spuntando "View (Radii in pixel size)", per chi utilizza versioni precedenti rimando a questo link sempre sul sito del LAmrUG.
    Il vantaggio di lavorare in pixel è semplice, è molto più immediato trovare i valori di interpolazione desiderati ragionando in pixel (sull'immagine aster), piuttosto che sulle unità di misura impostate nel modello.
    I "Final Gather Rays" non sono altro che i raggi che partono a emisfera da ciascun punto di final gather calcolato: maggiore è il numero di raggi, maggiore sarà l'accuratezza del calcolo locale dell'irradianza (non del calcolo complessivo, visto che in questo caso rientrano anche i min/max radius usati)
    Il Radius non ha niente a che vedere con la lunghezza dei raggi del final gather, questa misura viene definita dal "Falloff start/stop" (su cui non mi dilungherò ulteriormente).
    Un altro importante parametro è il filter, che permette di eliminare alcune macchie dovute a valori anomali di irradianza locale (bruciature in genere), valutando i valori di irradianza vicini tra loro. L'uso di questo filtro influisce sia sul tempo di render, sia sulla qualità del final gather
    Altri parametri importantissimi sono i "Trace Depth", "Trace Reflection" e "Trace Refraction" che concettualmente funzionano come i depth (i rimbalzi) della Global Illumination.
    L'ultima spunta "Secondary Diffuse Bounces" (presente solo su menral ray 3.4) attiva il famoso multibounces, che però non prenderemo neanche in considerazione in questo tutorial, visto che viene disabilitato nel caso di utilizzo della Global Illumination.

    "Preompute Photon Lookup" permette di anticipare una parte dei calcoli che il final gather fa durante la fase di rendering, questa impostazione è molto utile in caso di animazione, proprio perché si riducono i tempi della fase rendering.


    1.4.1 Impostare il Final Gather

    Ecco i miei parametri per i test

    usate come "Rays": 50 (per mental ray 3.3 usate almeno 100-200)
    portate il "Filter" da 0 a 1
    lasciate il "Radius" a 0 e lanciate il render a risoluzione bassa (400x300)

    questo è il mio risultato:


    ora si tratta di ottimizzare il radius, chi è già soddisfatto dei test col radius di default può partire da
    quelli andando a cercare nell'Output Windows quali valori mental ray ha assegnato e cercando di migliorarli come detto, radius basso= maggiori dettagli e maggiore noise in genere per le mie prove parto sempre da valori di radius basso usando pochi rays per non pesare troppo sui tempi dei test, con dei render region delle zone che più mi interessano cerco di capire qual è il migliore compromesso tra dettaglio e tempi di render

    ecco una prova con vari radius:




    A questo punto aumentate il radius in modo da riuscire a "spalmare" al meglio l'effetto puntinato che avrete con radius basso (ovviamente questa impostazione dipende dalla scala che state utilizzando, in genere 1-10 da dei buoni risultati nel rapporto tempo/qualità)
    trovato il radius fate dei render region nella zona in cui notate artefatti aumentando progressivamente i rays (il risultato è strettamente legato alla versione di mental ray che state usando, la versione 3.4 è ottimizzata anche per valori di rays molto bassi, riuscendo a restituire immagini senza artefatti, la versione 3.3 (o inferiori) ha bisogno di valori più alti) fino ad arrivare a un buon compromesso



    1.5 Rendering Finale

    per il rendering finale ci sono alcuni valori importanti da impostare, vi do una panoramica di quelli che utilizzo più frequentemente, senza entrare troppo nei particolari.


    1.5.1 I materiali
    Per riuscire ad ottenere dei render fotorealistici i materiali utilizzati sono fondamentali.
    Vi consiglio di iniziare ad approfondire lo studio sui materiali di mental ray, in particolare sul dgs, il dielectric e alcune varianti interessanti (dgs_fresnel, l_glass), il tutorial di Alessandro (Pantich) sull'argomento è un ottimo inizio.

    I vantaggi di questi materiali sono fondamentalmente di due tipi: minori tempi di rendering, migliore comportamento alla luce.
    Nel caso in cui abbiate intrapreso il tutorial usando un Lambert potete accorgervi delle differenze semplicemente assegnando a tutta la scena un DGS senza glossy ne riflessioni e facendo qualche test (ricordate che il per utilizzare il dgs, come gli altri materiali di mental ray, con i fotoni dovete impostare nello "photon shader" anche il dgs_photon o il mib_photon_basic, altrimenti la scena non riuscirà a ricevere fotoni)
    Per impostare una scena vi consiglio inoltre di iniziare con un materiale di un tipo e continuare con quello (se avete impostato la scena con un lambert cercate di utilizzare materiali maya anche quando andrete ad assegnare i veri materiali agli oggetti della scena, in questo modo vi evitate spiacevoli sorprese per il diverso comportamento alla luce).


    1.5.2 Anti-Aliasing quality


    Per il rendering finale è importantissimo ottimizzare l'AA in modo da non avere fastidiosi effetti di aliasing
    Il mio consiglio è l'ulitizzo del filtro Mitchell, che in mental ray offre il miglior rapporto qualità/velocità

    Importantissime sono le impostazioni di "Numbers of Samples" e "Contrast Threshold"

    Il "Min Sample Level" indica il numero minimo di raggi che mental ray utilizza.
    Il "Max Sample Level" (come dice anche il nome), il valore massimo.

    n.b.
    I valori di sampling in mental ray per Maya NON crescono linearmente, ma esponenzialmente
    quindi se utilizzate 0 samples avrete 1 raggio, 1 samples: 4 raggi, 2 samples: 16 raggi e così via. Questo significa che valori eccessivamente alti portano via tantissimo tempo nel rendering
    (in 3dmax i parametri sono diversi e corrispondono al numero di raggi, quindi quello che per Maya è il valore 0 in 3d Max sarà 1, ecc)

    Come viene definito l'uso di min o max samples?
    Attraverso il "Contrast Threshold". Questo è un parametro che viene spesso trascurato, ma è fondamentale per riuscire ad arrivare alla migliore resa possibile.
    Se in un'area del render si supera il valore di contrasto indicato, mental ray userà il max samples, se il contrasto rimane sotto la soglia userà il min samples (questo è utile in zone con colori uniformi, in cui non ha senso utilizzare valori alti di samples)
    Per un'analisi approfondita di Contrast Threshold e AA vi rimando al sito del LAmrUG

    Queste le impostazioni che suggerisco:
    Mitchell 4 | 4

    Min samples 0 (o -1) (per 3d max 1 o 1/4)
    Max samples 2 (per 3d max 16)

    R 0,05
    G 0,05
    B 0,05


    1.5.3 Area Light Sampling

    Questo parametro regola il noise generato dalle ombre di raytrace delle Area Light di mental ray
    Nel nostro caso dovremo selezionare la Point e andare nel pannello di "Mental ray" > "Area Light".
    Per riuscire a "ripulire" perfettamente la scena è importante capire il funzionamento dei seguenti parametri:
    "Sampling": numero di samples usato per le ombre.
    "Low Level": indica il numero di bounces (reflection/refraction depth) oltre il quale mental ray inizia a smette di utilizzare il parametro di "Sampling" e inizia a utilizzare i "Low Samples".
    Se viene utilizzato il valore 0 (default), mental ray non userà mai i low samples
    "Low Samples": valore di sampling che può essere impostato per I secondary bounces delle ombre.

    Per avere dei risultati buoni suggerisco i seguenti parametri:

    Samples 6-6 (max 8-8)
    Low Level 0 (o 2)
    Low Samples 3-3 (o 4-4)

    Esempio Area Light Samples default (3-3)

    Samples 6-6





    1.5.4 Colore della luce

    Per riuscire a trovare la migliore resa fotorealistica in questo tipo di rendering è fondamentale l'uso dei colori della luce.
    Su mental ray 3.4 avete una utility nuova, che io rittengo fondamentale, in cui potete utilizzare il colore della luce in gradi Kelvin
    Lo schema da seguire è il seguente:


    il trucco è impostare un valore molto vicino alla luce solare diretta per la spot e un valore più vicino a una skylight per l'area light

    Mib_cie_d


    Nel caso stiate usando una versione di mental ray precedente alla 3.4 utilizzate un colore tipo giallo/arancio
    per entrambe le luci e un azzurro leggero per il colore dei fotoni



    1.5.5 Bsp
    Il Binary Spatial Partitioning è un parametro fondamentale per ottimizzare i tempi di rendering in mental ray.
    Anche in questo caso occorrerebbe un tutorial a parte solo su questo parametro per riuscire ad essere esaustivo dell'argomento. Vi consiglio vivamente di consultare ancora una volta il sito del
    LAmrUG per trovare maggiori delucidazioni su cosa sia e come agisca il BSP.
    Il mio consiglio è: fate delle prove di rendering in piccolo, oppure dei render region di zone significative, e confrontate i tempi di rendering, provate con Depth a partire da 40 e scendete di 3 in 3 (37-34-31)
    In genere utilizzo valori di Depth attorno al 30, ma questo ovviamente dipende dal tipo di scena.


    1.5.6 Output framebuffer
    Mental ray non ha un vero e proprio controllo sul tonemapping, ma esistono varie tecniche per riuscire a gestire
    questo aspetto fondamentale del render.
    Una possibilità è utilizzare il parametro "gamma" ( "Render Global" > ""Framebuffer" > "gamma") che ci permette di migliorare la luminosità, specialmente delle parti in ombra (valori inferiori a 1 di default corrispondono a maggiore luminosità)
    Il mio consiglio però ricade su un'altra scelta, ovvero esportare in un formato 32bit e effettuare il tonemapping in post.
    Mental ray, dalla versione 3.3, supporta il formato OpenExr, di cui potrete trovare notizie e plugin per alcuni programmi sul sito ufficiale OpenExr
    Questo formato offre maggiori vantaggi rispetto al formato .hdr (in quanto ha una maggiore gamma dinamica) e al .tif (in quanto permette di immagazzinare i dati in metà spazio rispetto a un RGBA 16bit)

    Per chi usa la versione 3.4 di mental ray è molto semplice usare l'exr, nel "Framebuffer" impostate RGBA (float) 4x32bit e tra gli "image format" scegliete OpenExr.
    Per chi usa la versione 3.3 le cose si compliano, in questo caso vi consiglio di scaricare da questo sito il mrclasses di Gonzalo Garramunos e usare negli output shader della vostra camera l'output_exr, questo vi permetterà di salvere in .exr

    Per riassumere questi sono i valori da me utilizzati per il rendering finale visibile a inizio pagina.

    - RENDER GLOBAL
    AA Quality
    Samples -1 | 2
    Mitchel: 4 | 4
    Contrast R: 0,05
    Contrast G: 0,05
    Contrast B: 0,05
    Contrast A: 0,1

    Raytracing
    Reflection: 4
    Refraction: 4
    Max Trace Depth: 8

    GI
    Accuracy: 512
    Radius: 15
    Max Photon Depth: 5
    Max Reflection Photon: 5
    Max Refraction Photon: 5

    Final Gather
    Rays: 400
    Min / Max Radius: 2 | 15
    Filter: 1
    Trace Depth: 2
    Trace Reflection: 1
    Trace Refraction: 1

    - Altri parametri:
    Area Light
    Sampling: 6 | 6
    Low Level: 0


    2.0 Altri tipi di illuminazione

    Come ho già accennato prima di scrivere il tutorial ho effettuato diverse prove per scegliere le luci che meglio si adattassero a questo tipo di illuminazione.
    Questo è un elenco di luci usate con i relativi risultati, se state cercando un tipo particolare di illuminazione potete scegliere tra varie combinazioni possibili

    (Luce solare + luce diffusa)

    Direct + physical


    Direct+ point(arealight)


    Direct+ spot(arealight)


    Spot + physical


    Spot + spot(arealight)


    spero vi sia di aiuto, fatemi sapere cosa ne pensate
    mi scuso con tutti per eventuali (e molti probabili) errori di battitura e inesattezze, ma il tutorial è diventato talmente lungo, che mi è un po' passata la voglia di ricontrollarlo per l'ennesima volta.

    ciau

    Mat
    http://www.imodesti.com


    - Riferimenti:
    http://www.lamrug.org
    http://www.jupiter-jazz.com/
    http://www.impresszio.hu/szabolcs/MentalRa...RaySampling.htm

  3. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da neroquette in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   

    è una mappa view dependent, a differenza della photon map può essere usata da sola (ha un suo calcolo dell'irradianza), inoltre è basata su importance sampling e può fare il sampling anche dell'environment
    ora si può utilizzare assieme al FG e quindi funziona come metodo ausiliario (calcola solo i secondary bounces)
    l'ip map è salvabile
  4. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da papafoxtrot in Libro Su Mentalray Finalmente Disponibile!   
    ciao ragazzi grazie a tutti e scusate ancora per l'attesa prolungata, spero che il libro vi possa ripagare della fiducia




    ciao okami, allora il libro è pensato specificamente per l'ambito architettonico, quindi non ci sono parti specifiche sull'argomento che ti interessa
    i materiali SSS fast, insieme ai principali materiali mental ray, vengono trattati in un capitolo apposito, ma non c'è nessun esercizio, solo la spiegazione dei parametri, mi spiace

    cercherò di farvi avere un pdf con l'elenco dei capitoli, così potrete capire meglio come è strutturato il libro

    a presto

    mat
  5. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da pupazzooo in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   

    esatto, per il glossy devi fare uguale, ma anche a 8 potrebbe andare bene, dipende dalle scene
    poi sulle area light non sono sicuro che 1 sample vada bene, io ne userei 4 almeno, ma vanno fatti test specifici per capirlo
    certo per il sun 1 sample è più che sufficiente visto che è solo una leggere sfumatura
  6. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da papafoxtrot in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    Molto interessante anche la nuova IP, che con il controllo dei secondary rays (di default 8) è ora molto più veloce.
    Può anche essere combinata col FG, in modo da evitare problemi con superfici riflettenti/trasparenti

    Ecco una prova veloce:

    Stanzajap

    FG

    rays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 50
    bounces 3
    fg time 2m 30s
    total 2m 50s

    IP

    rays 500
    imp density 0.1
    interpolation 100
    bounces 3
    ip time 3m 07s
    total 3m 26s

    IP+FG

    FGrays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 50
    imp density 0.1
    bounces 3
    ip time 20s
    fg time 46s
    total 1m 27s


    FGrays 1000
    density 1.0
    interpolation 30
    imp density 0.1
    bounces 3
    ip time 20s
    fg time 2m39s
    total 3m 19s


    come potete vedere la nuova IP a parità di tempi è molto ma molto più qualitativa del FG, IP+FG permette di unire le due cose ottenendo render puliti in tempi molto brevi, oppure a parità di tempi ancora una volta porta a risultati migliori
  7. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da MatEvil in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   

    per notarlo basta switchare tra le due immagini 2009/2011, si vede subito la differenza
    tra le due versioni ci sono differenze di bugfix, non grandi differenze di velocità, principalmente noterai miglioramenti con BSP2 in alcuni ambiti specifici (con istanze, con displacement, con fur, con molte luci)

    la libreria mi sa che è fatta con materiali meta-sl, ma è una mia supposizione, potrei sbagliarmi
  8. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da icer in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    ecco un'altro test con una scena un po' più impegnativa (qualcuno dovrebbe riconoscerla)


    Ste scene interior

    FG

    rays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    bounces 2
    fg time 33m 25s
    total 1h 05m 03s


    IP

    rays 500
    imp density 0.1
    interpolation 100
    bounces 3
    ip time 6m 23s
    total 38m 48s


    IP+FG

    FGrays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    imp density 0.1
    bounces 3
    ip time 2m 16s
    fg time 12m 29s
    total 45m 45s


    come potete vedere nonostante qualche problemino l'IP è una scheggia! IP+FG è un po' meno veloce ma sempre competitivo... e vi mettete al riparo dai problemi
  9. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da icer in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    ecco un'altro test con una scena un po' più impegnativa (qualcuno dovrebbe riconoscerla)


    Ste scene interior

    FG

    rays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    bounces 2
    fg time 33m 25s
    total 1h 05m 03s


    IP

    rays 500
    imp density 0.1
    interpolation 100
    bounces 3
    ip time 6m 23s
    total 38m 48s


    IP+FG

    FGrays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    imp density 0.1
    bounces 3
    ip time 2m 16s
    fg time 12m 29s
    total 45m 45s


    come potete vedere nonostante qualche problemino l'IP è una scheggia! IP+FG è un po' meno veloce ma sempre competitivo... e vi mettete al riparo dai problemi
  10. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da icer in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    ecco un'altro test con una scena un po' più impegnativa (qualcuno dovrebbe riconoscerla)


    Ste scene interior

    FG

    rays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    bounces 2
    fg time 33m 25s
    total 1h 05m 03s


    IP

    rays 500
    imp density 0.1
    interpolation 100
    bounces 3
    ip time 6m 23s
    total 38m 48s


    IP+FG

    FGrays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    imp density 0.1
    bounces 3
    ip time 2m 16s
    fg time 12m 29s
    total 45m 45s


    come potete vedere nonostante qualche problemino l'IP è una scheggia! IP+FG è un po' meno veloce ma sempre competitivo... e vi mettete al riparo dai problemi
  11. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da ytsejam in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    Hola a tutti, ecco qualche test che ho fatto con le alcune delle novità di mental ray 3.8, che per inciso sono parecchie.

    Intanto il BSP2 è stato completamente rivisto e ora funziona molto meglio (molta meno ram utilizzata, tempi più bassi si quasi tutte le scene, in particolare su scene molto pesanti).

    Ajax scene (544.590 triangles) BSP2
    4161 proxies, 2.260.038.990 triangoli

    maya 2011 33s


    maya 2010 8m 41s (non finito)




    maya 2011 memory peak 880.872K
    maya 2010 memory peak 6.478.640K


    Displacement Chainmail BSP2


    maya 2011 fg 37s tot 2m47s memory peak 2.530.304


    maya 2011 fg 3m28s tot 5m38s memory peak 6.104.780
  12. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da icer in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    ecco un'altro test con una scena un po' più impegnativa (qualcuno dovrebbe riconoscerla)


    Ste scene interior

    FG

    rays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    bounces 2
    fg time 33m 25s
    total 1h 05m 03s


    IP

    rays 500
    imp density 0.1
    interpolation 100
    bounces 3
    ip time 6m 23s
    total 38m 48s


    IP+FG

    FGrays 500
    density 0.4
    interpolation 30
    imp density 0.1
    bounces 3
    ip time 2m 16s
    fg time 12m 29s
    total 45m 45s


    come potete vedere nonostante qualche problemino l'IP è una scheggia! IP+FG è un po' meno veloce ma sempre competitivo... e vi mettete al riparo dai problemi
  13. Like
    dagon ha ricevuto reputazione da ytsejam in Fun With Mental Ray 3.8   
    Hola a tutti, ecco qualche test che ho fatto con le alcune delle novità di mental ray 3.8, che per inciso sono parecchie.

    Intanto il BSP2 è stato completamente rivisto e ora funziona molto meglio (molta meno ram utilizzata, tempi più bassi si quasi tutte le scene, in particolare su scene molto pesanti).

    Ajax scene (544.590 triangles) BSP2
    4161 proxies, 2.260.038.990 triangoli

    maya 2011 33s


    maya 2010 8m 41s (non finito)




    maya 2011 memory peak 880.872K
    maya 2010 memory peak 6.478.640K


    Displacement Chainmail BSP2


    maya 2011 fg 37s tot 2m47s memory peak 2.530.304


    maya 2011 fg 3m28s tot 5m38s memory peak 6.104.780
  14. Downvote
    dagon ha dato la reputazione a Simone82 in Arion V1.0 È Stato Rilasciato   
    Quando l'ho detto io mi hanno risposto che non capivo una mazza e dovevo andare a studiare... Se avessi saputo che dovevo scrivere un trattato di calcolo parallelo l'avrei fatto, invece di limitarmi ad un linguaggio a me più consono, quello terraterra, visto che non sono un programmatore... +1 oggi, poi torno pure domani perché mi sono "sensibilizzato"...
×